Fifty for your thoughts

 A man standing outside of Dollar General asked me for fifty cents and I paid him with my thoughts and prayers. This is what I learned about the cost of being a bystander.

Never be too lazy to help others.
Man outside of Dollar General: “Miss I need .50 cents. Can you help me?”
Me: I had the change.  Did I give it to him?  No…
It was laziness that prevented me from reaching in my purse and giving him the change.  While walking away from the store, my thoughts and prayers began fill my heart. I also reflected on my personal financial debts, concerns and family members. Although I carelessly dismissed his request , I sincerely wished that someone else would stop and help him reach his goal.

Perspective is key. Don’t be a bystander.
I am sharing this experience with you because being bystander has consequences. In this moment I was a spectator attempting to mentally defuse the responsibility to someone else coming from the store. This experience taught me that life isn’t about helping my friends and family circles and ignoring others needs. I lost common courtesy for the common man and consequently lost my pocket-money.

Karma will come for you. 
Several hours later, I decided to take a twenty-minute bike ride to the Philadelphia Art Museum. After returning the bike to the Indego Bike Share station, I went to the ice cream truck and bought water and Gatorade.  I stuffed my cash back into my disorganized purse and walked away to my next destination. Somewhere between the ice cream truck and the journey to the bar I lost my fifteen dollars for drinks.

Looking back, I couldn’t allow myself to be upset about losing money after committing a moral blunder earlier in the day. After drowning my liver and wasting the money I “didn’t have” I felt obligated to shed light on the selfishness in being a bystander. After this experience I believe it is my duty to support and nurture others outside of personal circles. 

How car horns changed my life

 

There was a mind numbing, uncontrollable car horn beeping across the street today.

I watched people drive through the noise.

Walk near the noise.

Beep at the cars.

Walk past the cars as I screamed at the cars from my room.

No one could hear me.

While people were sleeping, I opened the window and investigated. I decided to go outside and figure out the owner of the culprit car.

Which one of you mind piercing, uncontrollable, headache bearing, four-wheeled boxes could make such a noise?

I approached the three cars and discovered it was the middle one!

What has this taught me and how can I possibly grow from this?

  1. Noises in life that are meant to distract you.
  2. Everything and one reacts differently to the same situation.
  3. It doesn’t matter how many times you watch a situation, something can be done about it and eventually it will stop.

In conclusion, my eye twitches anytime I hear car horns outside.

Rollin’ 


I went skating. I am learning to walk or roll away with a lesson in my pocket.  This lesson was to keep rocking and #rolling inspite of others.

I struggle with hand-eye and body coordination on a daily basis. So I kicked and pushed around that rink the best way I remember how and three people helped me along the way.  My loved on and two strangers gave me the best advice about skating and I’m going to apply it to my life.

Advice one: Don’t worry about others. We all have different skill levels.

While using my right leg to roll around the rink thoughts of envy crossed my mind. In my opinion everyone was able to skate using the proper technique and even skate backwards or one legged. I desperately wanted to try a new trick however,  my skill level was no where close to theirs. Each time my butt hit the floor the fun of pushing along began to fade. I lost focus of having fun and began to concentrate on the lack of skill.

As she skated to my left and reminded me that no one has the same technique or skill. Everyone has to start somewhere and to continue to skate on.
Advice two: Bend your legs and move. 

After the second time I fell on the floor chosing not to bend my knees seemed to be the best option. I was determined to remain upright like others.

I slid past a friendly skater who reminded me that bending my knees would help with my balance and keep me steady.

I added a slightly bended knee to my kick push routine and successful rolled along the wall.
Advice three: Concentrate!  

My ability to stand still while wearing skates was at a solid zero. I felt like an octopus out of water and flailing around while listening to a seasoned skater’s advice. He commended my ability to remain upright inspite of my lack of official training and guidance however my lack of concentration was visible. I just wanted to get around the rink by any means necessary which resulted in losing my focus on skating safely and having fun.

After the trials, errors, and conversations I rolled out a better person than I walked in. I learned to keep rolling, concentrate and not to worry about others skill set in comparison to mine. I am going to apply the lessons from skating to life’s challenges and grow all situation.

Welcome

Hi World,

  1. My name is Daphne with two syllables.
  2. This blog is a small step toward gaining responsibility and overcoming weakness in my adult life.
  3. I am dedicated to evolving myself through writing and photography.
  4. Feedback is welcome and constructive criticism is accepted.
  5. I own everything on this website.

Have a great day!

~Daphne